Talking about turnover – Part II: solutions

In my previous post I introduced the issue of turnover in humanitarian organizations, trying to explain, based on the available literature, why it presents challenges and what are the possible reasons that lead employees to leave organizations. In this post I will deal with some of the solutions that have been suggested and/or implemented to …

Continue reading Talking about turnover – Part II: solutions

Talking about turnover – Part I: the problem

This is the first of two posts where I deal with the issue of turnover in humanitarian organizations. I introduce the problem and some of its possible drivers here. Here you can find the second post, focused on solutions. Humanitarian workers don’t like long commitments. Obviously, I am talking about work. Chances are that a …

Continue reading Talking about turnover – Part I: the problem

GPS in humanitarian settings

As I had the chance to note in another post, consideration of the spatial dimension is often forgotten in aid work, and a whole set of tools and approaches are still not known by many practicioners. I happened to see drafts of settlement plans sketched not with a GIS program nor with AutoCad but with …

Continue reading GPS in humanitarian settings

Some notes on trainings

Trainings can be a blessing or a curse. I guess there is no need to explain why they are a blessing. On the other hand, I believe that with trainings there is a high risk of being satisfied with the activity being done rather than focusing on its eventual impact. Delivering a training doesn’t mean …

Continue reading Some notes on trainings

An intention survey in Melut

As I mentioned in a previous entry about the relocation in Bor, what to do out of the PoCs was (and still is) one of the most debated issues on humanitarian policy in South Sudan. When talking about a phasing out strategy, there were security, logistical, political considerations to put in the picture. And there …

Continue reading An intention survey in Melut